A place to share cool science ideas for storytime!

Posts tagged ‘wind’

Wind and Rain

Wind by Marion Dane Bauer

Easy to understand explanation of wind and how it works.

I Face the Wind by Vicki Cobb, illustrated by Julia Gorton

Explanations of wind including activities within the book to help children engage with the concepts.

The Wind by Monique Felix

Fun wordless book about a mouse who sees flying things in the sky. He builds a pinwheel out of the paper in the book so he can fly as well.

Willa and the Wind retold by Janice M. Del Negro and illustrated by Heather Solomon.

This is an original story based on a Norwegian Folktale. A beautifully illustrated picture book about a girl who goes to visit the Wind and gets priceless gifts each time she visits.

Splish, Splash, Ducky! By Lucy Cousins

Quack, quack, quack! Ducky Duckling loves playing outside in the rain. He hops with frog, squirms with wriggly worm and splashes with the fishes.

Cloudette by Tom Lichtenheld

Cloudette is a little cloud who is looking to do something big. She discovers new friends, new adventures, and her own silver lining.

Cloudette bookmark coloring activity here : https://www.tomlichtenheld.com/childrens_books/images/activity_guides/BookmarkLichtenheld.pdf

The Rain Came Down

Caldecott Honor artist David Shannon captures the mayhem after an unexpected rainstorm.

Drip painting activity https://inspirationlaboratories.com/the-rain-came-down-drip-painting/

Wind activities: http://keepinglifecreative.com/creative-learning/the-windy-day-book-of-week

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Wind Science

The Wind Blew by Pat Hutchins is a wonderful rhyming tale of the wind that is blowing everyone’s things away. The Scholastic site has extension activities geared to the book.

https://www.scholastic.com/teachers/lesson-plans/teaching-content/wind-blew-extension-activities/

Windblown is an entertaining book that shows ways that different colored shapes can be combined to make different pictures and characters. The narrative is short and simple and the colorful illustrations show a variety of creative creations.

 Former U.S. Poet Laureate Ted Kooser authored this wonderfully illustrated picture book that tells of the journey of a lone, yellow plastic bag that escaped from a landfill and the environmental consequences as well as the ways unwanted items can be reused.

In this wind experiment at the link below, children can build simple devices to collect things blowing in the wind.  They’ll need a few plastic lids, petroleum jelly, a magnifying glass, a paper punch to punch a hole in each lid, yarn and a windy day.  After hanging them outside on a windy day for a while, children can examine what the wind has blown into their lid.

http://stem-works.com/external/activity/20

Activities at the link below include the key science concepts that wind can move things and that wind is moving air.

Ideas include discussions that the wind can move things such as clouds in the sky, and sailboats on the water. Have children, think and demonstrate different ways they can make the air move and create a breeze (blowing, waving the hands, using a fan, etc.). Ask if they know of any tools or machines that move air (hair dryers, fans, etc.).

Wind experimentation and prediction as well as directions for a simple windsock made from a paper bowl, tissue paper, crepe paper streamers and pipe cleaners.

http://www.ready-set-read.com/2013/04/preschool-theme-wind.html

In this experiment children blow on objects to simulate the wind (a wooden block, paper cup, metal spoon, piece of construction paper, craft pom pom, feather, and rock).

http://www.prekinders.com/can-the-wind-move-it/

Other wind themed activities can be found at https://www.kidssoup.com/activity/wind-and-air-activities-crafts-games-and-printables and http://sciencing.com/science-activities-air-preschool-ages-6468647.html.

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Wind/Air Movement

The Wind Blew by Pat Hutchins

Give the kids straws and various objects (rocks, leaves, spoons, Kleenex, feathers, LEGOs, etc.) and have them try and blow the objects across the table. Before starting, you can have the children predict which objects they will be able to move.

the wind blew

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